" tolerance of objectification can make people disrespectful of nature (abhorring natural disaster, genetic limitations including cancer, physical limitations such as susceptibility to disease, and death, even laughing at the threat posed by nature - regarding nature as without meaning, merely being functional or an end in itself) "

- philosophy of the body  refresh

Philosophy of the Body

Perspective


The Objectification Wiki

The Objectification Wiki is a forum devoted to the open discussion of the issue of Objectification in society. Note it contains the contents of the Philosophy of the Body (as published during its development) and may be used for the public review of this manuscript.

Note the Objectification Wiki is registered under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License, so it may be both edited by anyone and used by anyone, so long as the derivative work attributes all Objectification Wiki content to the author of the relevant Objectification Wiki contribution(s) in the manner specified by the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse them or their use of the work). For citation purposes, all Objectification Wiki contributions up to and included at least version 23 October 2012c were made by RBB, and we request that the source of these contributions be referenced (Philosophy of the Body).

If you would like to contribute to this manuscript visit the Objectification Wiki. Suggestions are most welcome - and note these are specifically requested as we would like this document to be as accurate a reflection of contemporary relations as possible (social and psychological).



" the history of the tolerance of objectification is questionable. The Obscene Publications Act of 1857 and the legal definition of obscenity of 1868 ("whether the tendency of the matter charged as obscenity is to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences") were established to criminalise objectification following major developments in photography (1851). As "obscenity" is not protected under the First Amendment of the US constitution, objectification manufacturers sought to change the legal definition, first succeeding in 1957 making it relative to time dependent, person dependent, and ambient content dependent "standards" which as a consequence have never successfully been used to prevent the objectification of human beings "

- philosophy of the body  refresh


This website is an initiative of the RBB Foundation.
Copyright © 2010, Richard Baxter. All Rights Reserved.
We acknowledge the Wikimedia Commons and their respective contributors (Artwork),
and the Wikimedia Foundation for MediaWiki v1.18 (HTML generation)